Trelawny – The Cockpit Country

The Cockpit country is found in southern Trelawny, a rugged region, which is formed from white limestone with elevations and depressions characterized by deep sinkholes and steep-sided circular arenas.  This dangerous terrain makes approximately half of the parish uninhabitable.

Of the 353 sq. miles, 166 are about 1000 feet above sea level, 135 between 1000 and 2000 feet above sea level and 32 between 2000 and 3000 feet above sea level. Most of the parish is flat with wide plains.  The highest point is Mount Ayr, which is 3000 feet above sea level.    These high and low areas are the reason the parish is divided into what is called Upper and Lower Trelawny.   Most of the communities of southern Trelawny lie to the east of the border of the cockpit country.

It is covered with ‘virgin forest,’ a wide range of tropical species.  Trees such as the broadleaf, mahogany, silk, and cotton and Santa Maria may grow as high as 60 ft.  between these trees are shrubs, orchids, ferns, mosses and lichens.